DeeAnn Marie

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When Struggling Families Spark Internet Rage

Ms. Kenneally told Op-Talk that she was devastated by the response. After the Slate article’s publication, she said, she was soon fielding calls from Kayla and others. She was concerned for her subjects: young, vulnerable people who were reading comments on Facebook calling them “trash.” She added that social media had changed these subjects’ lives: “These guys live on Facebook like they used to live on their front porch.”

Filed under poverty nytimes struggling families slate families portrait

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woaroof:

"Respond to your emotions honestly; be genuine and authentic. Swallow your bitterness, never your pride." — Without a Roof 

Connecting with people in the midst of extreme poverty opens your heart, not only to their personal suffering, the miscast perceptions and hopelessness — but to the chronic injustice poor people face. Perpetual indignity strips their humanity and drains hope and happiness from the soul. 

This boomerangs back to anger, anger at injustice, anger at having your character and dreams stifled by the callous bigotry of people that dismiss people that look or smell poor.  

Deal with injustice head-on and keep your anger from simmering into an ugly keyboard outburst, a scowl, or an ignorant hurtful wag of the tongue. Dignity and humanity matter. 

1) Focus your anger at actions, not people.

2) Don’t run from your anger — channel it in a manner and response that tactfully and demonstrably relays what has made you angry, not who made you angry. 

3) Anger has three levels: Irritated, frustrated and mad. Become aware when you are experiencing these emotions and address them before it turns into rage.

4) Be intelligent when your angry and use your response to move away from anger and towards solutions. 

There are no shortcuts to achieving strong emotional intelligence. Phony smiles, corny platitudes and abrasive behavior are tactics of the meek. Be aware of your needs and strong to your character.

woaroof:

"Respond to your emotions honestly; be genuine and authentic. Swallow your bitterness, never your pride." — Without a Roof

Connecting with people in the midst of extreme poverty opens your heart, not only to their personal suffering, the miscast perceptions and hopelessness — but to the chronic injustice poor people face. Perpetual indignity strips their humanity and drains hope and happiness from the soul.

This boomerangs back to anger, anger at injustice, anger at having your character and dreams stifled by the callous bigotry of people that dismiss people that look or smell poor.

Deal with injustice head-on and keep your anger from simmering into an ugly keyboard outburst, a scowl, or an ignorant hurtful wag of the tongue. Dignity and humanity matter.

1) Focus your anger at actions, not people.

2) Don’t run from your anger — channel it in a manner and response that tactfully and demonstrably relays what has made you angry, not who made you angry.

3) Anger has three levels: Irritated, frustrated and mad. Become aware when you are experiencing these emotions and address them before it turns into rage.

4) Be intelligent when your angry and use your response to move away from anger and towards solutions.

There are no shortcuts to achieving strong emotional intelligence. Phony smiles, corny platitudes and abrasive behavior are tactics of the meek. Be aware of your needs and strong to your character.


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kellyisnice:

myfosterstories:

awoodenpen:

mamamusement:

myfosterstories:

"Originally created for the 168 Film Festival, ReMoved follows the emotional story through the eyes of a young girl taken from her home and placed into foster care."

Film background info:

http://www.christianpost.com/news/removed-wins-168-film-festival-best-film-award-up-to-1-million-prize-102143/

Tears streamed down as I watched this. THIS IS WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO.

This is THE BEST depiction of Foster Care that I’ve ever seen on Film. I agree with so many of the video’s comments, this should be used in all Foster Parent trainings. Please Share. 

E and I just watched this movie. It was very moving. E had a lot of great insights and I cried. Worth the 12 minutes.

At the 5:30 mark, she brings all her worldly possessions in a black trash bag. She brings it into blank room and sits with it on her empty bunkbed.

When they came a month after Christmas and the week of his birthday and birthday party, they came with one suitcase and three black trash bags. Though 5 and 7, they fit into sizes 4T and 5T.

We looked at one year ago pictures last night. Neither of us slept well. Diva only occasionally sleeps well. Little Man never does.

But, now, they are happy.

reblogging because I wanted to add; the trash bag plays a crucial role in this film. To me it was partially what made it SO TRUE to the real foster care experience. Every child in care that I’ve seen or known (as a former foster care case manager and foster parent) has dragged that god forsaken trash bag full of their only possessions from home to home.  

I’m a mess. This is closest I’ll ever get to seeing and understanding what Alice has been through. She fits so perfectly into my life that it’s easy for me to forget about all of the other families she’s had and lost. I can’t even imagine walking away from her. You’d have to pry my dead arms off of her to take her from me.

And now I’m going to go lay next to her and thank God that I can call her my own. Forever. For always. And no matter what.

We see too many kids in the emergency shelter that have been through the foster care system. Heartbreaking.
But I know a couple of foster mom’s and they are so amazing. They give me hope.

(via thinksquad)