DeeAnn Marie

Posts tagged Homeless

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The number one question I get asked by well meaning Christian folks who want to “help the homeless” always centers around panhandlers and being “taken advantage of”. I will tell you how to avoid being taken advantage of by homeless and panhandlers. In fact, how to quit being taken advantage of by anyone. You ready? Give up ownership of what you are giving away.

Hugh Hollowell 

Whoa.

(via azspot)

Filed under panhandlers homeless

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How Homeless People Use Technology: A Photo Essay On Street Poverty And Consumer Gadgets

I’m seeing more and more people staying in the emergency shelter who not only have smart phones but laptops or tablets as well. They are treasured possessions. These devices help people find jobs and resources and connect with family and friends. Poverty can be isolating and boring and technology can give people who have limited mobility or trouble socializing access to the outside world.

Filed under homelessness homeless technology poverty gadgets new york

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A Tupelo [MS] woman hired earlier this month by a KFC was fired Monday after the franchise owner discovered she’s homeless.

Eunice Jasica has been staying at the Salvation Army lodge since early December after losing her job, her car and her home.

The nonprofit organization requires its residents to seek employment daily and, upon finding it, to pay for lodging and start saving for a place of their own. Jasica said she had been job hunting for months and was relieved to find work on March 11 at the KFC on North Gloster Street.

A document signed by that location’s general manager on March 12 confirms Jasica had been hired to perform “prep work” and would receive a paycheck every two weeks.

But when Jasica reported for duty Monday, franchise owner Chesley Ruff withdrew the job offer upon learning she lived at the Salvation Army.

“He told me to come back when I had an address and transportation,” Jasica recalled. “But how am I supposed to get all that without a job?”

Ruff signed a letter the same day stating he couldn’t employ her “due to concerns of lack of residence and transportation” and that she could reapply when her circumstances change.

On Thursday, though, Ruff said he’d only used the homeless excuse to protect Jasica from the real reason he declined her services: She has no prior food-prep experience and seemed too elderly to lift the 40-pound boxes involved in kitchen work.

Jasica is 59 years old and had worked 27 years as a bus driver and also did security for Bloomingdale’s. She attends classes at Itawamba Community College when she’s not job hunting.

Emily Le Coz, “Woman Fired For Being Homeless,” clarionledger.com 3/21/13 (via racialicious)

The Emergency Shelter I work at, potential employers will sometimes pretend to be donors when they call on the phone to find out more about what our organization is. When we mention that we help people experiencing homelessness the employers either hang up or start berating us. This story, unfortunately, does not surprise me.

(via abaldwin360-deactivated20130708)

Filed under homeless emergency shelter homeless shelter tranportation employment

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Canada's Homeless Showing

When people have to decide between paying the rent and paying for food, medicine, or other essentials, they experience more stress. Lack of good quality housing has been linked to poor health and educational outcomes. Ensuring everyone has good housing can reduce societal costs related to health care and the justice system. In the end, making sure we all have good housing benefits everyone.

Filed under Winnipeg Free Press Winnipeg Homeless Homelessness social determinants of health

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GOOD Magazine: Skid Row Part 1: Introduction


I watched 4 of this 5 part series today about Skid Row in Los Angeles as inspiration for some documentary style videos I want to shoot around Saskatoon. And then I read this article posted yesterday on the Los Angeles Times website entitled:
Los Angeles Skid Row Cleanup Nets Nearly 5 Tons of Refuse. And I think it’s bad cleaning up some of our suites after hoarders move out:

In all, nearly five tons of trash and more than 81 cubic yards of wastewater were collected from six miles of roadway and sidewalks between 5th and 7th streets and Gladys Avenue and Wall Street, said Michelle Vargas, a spokeswoman for the city Department of Public Works. The haul included soiled mattresses, sofas, wheelchairs and portable commodes.

City workers also removed 278 hypodermic needles, 94 syringes, 60 razor blades, 10 knives, 11 items of drug paraphernalia and a stash of marijuana, Vargas said. Most of the needles were recovered from San Julian Street, between 6th and 7th, an area where police say drug dealers and their clients congregate.

Two 5-gallon buckets of feces and three similar-sized buckets of urine were found in a nearby block of 6th, where a more entrenched homeless encampment had formed, Vargas said.

Um, whoa. Time for some more public washrooms LA.

Filed under Los Angeles Times homeless homelessness skid row Good Magazine

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Anonymous wealthy couple's $30-million gift to help homeless in Vancouver

Coun. Kerry Jang, a University of B.C. professor of psychiatry who specializes in mental health issues and is the city’s representative on housing and homeless issues, was nearly moved to tears by the donors’ largesse. He said he and city staff, including Judy Graves, the coordinator specializing in dealing with the homeless, have sometimes despaired at trying to solve the complex, interwoven issues of homelessness, addiction and mental health.

“It is a bit of an emotional moment for me, simply because for many years Judy and I and many of our staff have been out there and we see the suffering every single day. And every day I feel hopeless because what can we do? We put [people] into hospital for a while and they are let back out on the street again with no hope. It is just a revolving door, a revolving door, a revolving door,” he said.

“Taylor Manor is fundamentally different. Taylor Manor provides that hope, that place of belonging, that place of care. It is like when you come home from a long trip and you come in through the front door and sit down on the couch and breathe ‘I’m home.’ This is the vision of our donors and one that I am so glad to help bring forward.”


It’s stories like this that give me hope that people do care about the homeless.
Edit: I found this article through someone on facebook who wrote:
the numbers are stupid. 30 mill for 50 some people?
And I wrote:
The article says, “$14 million renovation and expansion plan for the 1915 Tudor Revival-style heritage mansion” so that’s to get it started and the annual operating budget is $900,000.
Sounds like the rest of the money is being put in an account where the interest will continue to pay for operations. Restoring buildings is crazy expensive and housing in general in Vancouver is very costly. This insures that after renovations, that the place will continued to be used for its intended purpose to help the homeless, and not be bought by some developer when times get tough.

Besides being a really long winded answer to somebody complaining on their own facebook (I’m waiting to be mocked), I forgot to mention, government funding is very fickle stuff. While the current municipal gov’t in Vancouver is striving to end homelessness, the provincial gov’t hasn’t been as gung-ho about putting homeless people in new units.


If funding is freely given by one gov’t, when a different one is elected that funding can just as easily stop. Which makes operating a non-profit very precarious - cozy up to close to one gov’t and the next pulls your funding, don’t cozy up enough to the one you have and they’ll forget the great work you are doing. It’s best not to have to rely on gov’t funding at all, but that requires donors and often very generous donors, so that groups can adapt to the needs of their community and the lean times can be weathered.

Filed under homeless homelessness Vancouver donors complex needs addiction mental health housing

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When I first started at The Lighthouse I was trying to figure out how to tell the story of what it is like to be homeless. In the middle of summer, Saskatoon was very lucky to have an amazing homelessness advocate stop by, named Mark Horvath. He started a project called InvisiblePeople.tv, where he does brief interview with people experiencing homelessness. His videos illuminate who is homeless and why, but also how people experiencing homelessness are just like anybody else. They want to be heard, they want to share their story.

Mark is from Los Angeles, where he was homeless at one time himself. He toured across Canada last summer with support from the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness. He shot the above video right outside the Lighthouse front doors. I am proud to say Richard now has a home at the Lighthouse, and is doing great in his own suite.

Now Mark is fundraising to tell the stories of people experiencing homelessness in the UK. But he needs your help. Until June 29th, every donation will be matched by a generous donor. Mark writes:

The first signs of a serious homelessness crisis in England’s towns and cities are emerging, with increases in rough sleeping, street drinking, crime and antisocial behavior as a result of swingeing cuts to hostel and housing services. Charities have warned that official figures showing a 14% rise in people classed as homeless are just the “tip of the iceberg”, because they fail to capture huge numbers who have been displaced from their home and are living with friends, in hostels or on the streets. For 10 days in early July Invisible People will tour the UK helping homeless people and homeless services tell their story.


Please donated here, so this important project of giving invisible people a voice can continue. I donated! You should too!

Filed under Mark Horvath UK donate hardlynormal homeless homelessness invisible people invisiblepeople.tv non-profits

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Invisible Families: The Homeless You Don't See

Moore is down to her last $6. It’s nearing 10 o’clock and it’s been hours since the two have had a meal.

Mall security has been circling. Moore knows they can’t spend the night parked here, but the 49-year-old single mother, born and raised in South King County, has no clue where to go.

“I’m mentally exhausted,” she says.

While overall homelessness in King County has steadied, it appears to be rising among families, a trend playing out across the nation.

Parents with children are the fastest-growing yet least-visible segment of the homeless population, far more likely to be doubled up in the homes of friends or living in their cars than to be at a busy intersection asking for help.

At its core, homelessness is driven by poverty and lack of affordable housing, and many believe the true breadth of the problem may not yet be evident as families who lost their homes in this recession still hang on with relatives.


So many great articles and videos to watch at the link about families experiencing homelessness in the Seattle Area. As a family it is really hard to stay together in the shelter system. 

With more and more families experiencing homelessness, no wonder they choose to sleep in their vehicles, or abandoned buildings. Homelessness and the supports to emergency house families often seems designed to take away the supports and community people already have in place.

Filed under homelessness invisible families homeless seattle families

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Via laughingsquid:

Mobile Homeless Homes, A Trojan House & Outraged Homeless Muppets Are Planning To Converge on Goldman Sachs

My coworker told me a story yesterday as we watched a spring downpour. Early last spring, a woman was sleeping/living under a stairwell in Saskatoon, all bundled up in her winter parka. The maintenance of the building or the city workers were pressure washing the building and the sidewalk and didn’t notice her (or they did) and doused her and all the possessions she had. She arrived at the Salvation Army just looking so utterly defeated.
Many people experiencing homelessness chose not to burden others or are embarrassed. Some can’t get funding to stay at an emergency shelter and can’t afford it themselves. But when a person is completely drenched they have to try to find better shelter because the combination of being wet and cold will kill you in your sleep.
This Mobile Homeless Home advertisement is actually an art project but also a protest piece. For some people this is the safest place they would be able to sleep at night.
Edit: My GM informs me they actually use these type of things in Oregon and California, tents which can be transported in a cart. “There they see it as innovation”. Apparently they are popular in tent cities as well.

Via laughingsquid:

Mobile Homeless Homes, A Trojan House & Outraged Homeless Muppets Are Planning To Converge on Goldman Sachs

My coworker told me a story yesterday as we watched a spring downpour. Early last spring, a woman was sleeping/living under a stairwell in Saskatoon, all bundled up in her winter parka. The maintenance of the building or the city workers were pressure washing the building and the sidewalk and didn’t notice her (or they did) and doused her and all the possessions she had. She arrived at the Salvation Army just looking so utterly defeated.

Many people experiencing homelessness chose not to burden others or are embarrassed. Some can’t get funding to stay at an emergency shelter and can’t afford it themselves. But when a person is completely drenched they have to try to find better shelter because the combination of being wet and cold will kill you in your sleep.

This Mobile Homeless Home advertisement is actually an art project but also a protest piece. For some people this is the safest place they would be able to sleep at night.

Edit: My GM informs me they actually use these type of things in Oregon and California, tents which can be transported in a cart. “There they see it as innovation”. Apparently they are popular in tent cities as well.

Filed under homeless emergencyshelter mobilehomelesshomes homelessness