DeeAnn Marie

Posts tagged housing

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The Atlantic Cities:
“How Crummy, Run-Down Housing Harms the Children Who Live in It
Emily Badger. Oct 24, 2013
The housing crisis sounded all kinds of alarms for policymakers and the public about what happens when families can’t afford their homes, or when they lose the stability that a secure home provides. We’ve heard about the effects of foreclosures on neighborhoods, the weight of housing stress on human health, the impact of lost equity on household wealth for huge portions of the U.S. population.
But something has been absent in all this talk about how unstable housing in any form affects families.
"The attention raised by the mortgage crisis and the foreclosure crisis really missed a lot of central aspects of housing that are likely to be important for children," says Rebekah Levine Coley, a professor in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College.
Notably, it’s the quality of housing – the presence of peeling paint or cockroaches, broken appliances or damaged walls – that most strongly predicts a child’s well-being and development.”
Photo: Shutterstock

 

The Atlantic Cities:

How Crummy, Run-Down Housing Harms the Children Who Live in It

Emily Badger. Oct 24, 2013

The housing crisis sounded all kinds of alarms for policymakers and the public about what happens when families can’t afford their homes, or when they lose the stability that a secure home provides. We’ve heard about the effects of foreclosures on neighborhoods, the weight of housing stress on human health, the impact of lost equity on household wealth for huge portions of the U.S. population.

But something has been absent in all this talk about how unstable housing in any form affects families.

"The attention raised by the mortgage crisis and the foreclosure crisis really missed a lot of central aspects of housing that are likely to be important for children," says Rebekah Levine Coley, a professor in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College.

Notably, it’s the quality of housing – the presence of peeling paint or cockroaches, broken appliances or damaged walls – that most strongly predicts a child’s well-being and development.”

Photo: Shutterstock

Filed under housing poverty household wealth mortgage crisis foreclosure crisis

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vocativ:

The world’s tallest slum: For the first time, cameras go inside seething Caracas’ notorious Tower of David. VIDEO —>

"Welcome to the world’s tallest slum: poverty-ridden Venezuela’s Tower of David. Squatters took over this very unfinished 45-story skyscraper in the early 1990s, and they’ve been there ever since. The tower was originally intended to be a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future, complete with a rooftop helipad, but construction stopped because of a banking crisis and the sudden death of the tower’s namesake, David Brillembourg."

Find out more at Vocativ

(via urbanplannerholic)

Filed under housing poverty urbanism

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Formerly Homeless Man Invents Portable Shelters to Help Others
A formerly homeless Utah man has used his insight to create and build “survival pods,” or mini-shelters, to be doled out to people who currently have nowhere to live. 
“I believe a person needs the dignity of something they can call their own, even if it’s only this,” Gary Pickering, a retired auto-body-shop owner in Pleasant Grove, told TV news station KSL Tuesday. Pickering, 73, was technically homeless for three years following a divorce in the late 1980s, when he lived in his shop. 
“I lost my home after I signed everything over to my wife and seven children,” he told Yahoo! Shine. “But I had a roof over my head.” Because his shop was in an industrial area, he got to know many of the homeless men who lived in broken-down cars or in other corners of the area, eventually housing four in his van during a particularly harsh winter. He learned what it was like to not have a place to live, through the men he met, who explained that they didn’t go to shelters because of reasons ranging from “They steal my shoes” to “They won’t let me bring my dog.”The lessons stuck with Pickering, who in 2009, long after he’d gotten back on his feet, saw a homeless man while driving through the nearby town of Provo. He went home and constructed a 2-foot-wide, 6-foot-long “cocoon,” mainly out of plywood. “But when I went to the find the man to give it to him, I couldn’t find him again,” he recalled.
Pickering became passionate about coming up with the perfect temporary shelter. And after years of trial and error, he believes he’s finally perfected the “survival pod”: a 4-foot-wide, 8-foot-long micro house constructed from sheets of pressed wood, a wooden frame and a roof made of soft corrugated plastic called Coroplast. There’s room enough inside for a sleeping bag, a kerosene lamp (there are vents in the structure), several small items, and even a specially designed portable toilet. Plus, the pods can be hooked up to electricity, like a trailer, if parked on already wired property with the permission of a homeowner.Pickering has constructed five of the pods, personally funding them at a cost of about $500 apiece, he said.“I didn’t do this as a business, I don’t want a business. I want to inspire other people,” Pickering toldKSL, explaining to Yahoo! Shine that he’s created how-to DVDs and photos to show folks with the money and the desire to build the structures for people who need them. Then, homeless people could either pay for them slowly, “so they can have some pride in it, and say ‘It’s mine,’” or make a formal lending agreement. 
 
The pods are built on wheels, like trailers, to get around zoning codes for buildings, Pickering added, so they could be placed in empty warehouses, hangars or on a piece of ground just outside of a city. Since the story of his invention aired on KSL, he said he’s already had an inquiry from a man who would like to buy a pod “for emergencies.” But mainly, they are meant to be temporary shelters for those in immediate, short-term crises. Considering the fact that 63 percent of Utah’s homeless population is without a home only temporarily, according to a 2012 report, the pods could really have an impact on the community.“People can find jobs, of course they’ll move on and get their nice house back and have their cars and everything,” he said. “But till that time, this will help them.” 

This is a good idea but actual HOUSING is better.

Formerly Homeless Man Invents Portable Shelters to Help Others

A formerly homeless Utah man has used his insight to create and build “survival pods,” or mini-shelters, to be doled out to people who currently have nowhere to live. 
“I believe a person needs the dignity of something they can call their own, even if it’s only this,” Gary Pickering, a retired auto-body-shop owner in Pleasant Grove, told TV news station KSL Tuesday. 

Pickering, 73, was technically homeless for three years following a divorce in the late 1980s, when he lived in his shop. 
“I lost my home after I signed everything over to my wife and seven children,” he told Yahoo! Shine. “But I had a roof over my head.” Because his shop was in an industrial area, he got to know many of the homeless men who lived in broken-down cars or in other corners of the area, eventually housing four in his van during a particularly harsh winter. He learned what it was like to not have a place to live, through the men he met, who explained that they didn’t go to shelters because of reasons ranging from “They steal my shoes” to “They won’t let me bring my dog.”

The lessons stuck with Pickering, who in 2009, long after he’d gotten back on his feet, saw a homeless man while driving through the nearby town of Provo. He went home and constructed a 2-foot-wide, 6-foot-long “cocoon,” mainly out of plywood. “But when I went to the find the man to give it to him, I couldn’t find him again,” he recalled.
Pickering became passionate about coming up with the perfect temporary shelter. And after years of trial and error, he believes he’s finally perfected the “survival pod”: a 4-foot-wide, 8-foot-long micro house constructed from sheets of pressed wood, a wooden frame and a roof made of soft corrugated plastic called Coroplast. 

There’s room enough inside for a sleeping bag, a kerosene lamp (there are vents in the structure), several small items, and even a specially designed portable toilet. Plus, the pods can be hooked up to electricity, like a trailer, if parked on already wired property with the permission of a homeowner.

Pickering has constructed five of the pods, personally funding them at a cost of about $500 apiece, he said.

“I didn’t do this as a business, I don’t want a business. I want to inspire other people,” Pickering toldKSL, explaining to Yahoo! Shine that he’s created how-to DVDs and photos to show folks with the money and the desire to build the structures for people who need them. Then, homeless people could either pay for them slowly, “so they can have some pride in it, and say ‘It’s mine,’” or make a formal lending agreement. 
 
The pods are built on wheels, like trailers, to get around zoning codes for buildings, Pickering added, so they could be placed in empty warehouses, hangars or on a piece of ground just outside of a city. 

Since the story of his invention aired on KSL, he said he’s already had an inquiry from a man who would like to buy a pod “for emergencies.” 

But mainly, they are meant to be temporary shelters for those in immediate, short-term crises. Considering the fact that 63 percent of Utah’s homeless population is without a home only temporarily, according to a 2012 report, the pods could really have an impact on the community.

“People can find jobs, of course they’ll move on and get their nice house back and have their cars and everything,” he said. “But till that time, this will help them.” 

This is a good idea but actual HOUSING is better.

(Source: Yahoo!, via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

Filed under urbanism housing housing first homelessness homeless shelter

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Wrong Side of Hong Kong

Despite being well-known as the home to millionaires, many poor call cages home.

Anger over housing prices is a common theme in increasingly frequent antigovernmet protests. Legislator Frederick Fung warns there will be more if the problem can’t be solved. He compared the effect o the poor to a lab experiment.

"When we were in secondary school, we had some sort of experiment where we put many rats in a small box. They would bite each other," said Fung. "When living spaces are so congested, they would make people feel uneasy, desperate,"and angry at the government, he said.

Filed under housing poverty hong kong poor public housing Associated Press

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Anonymous wealthy couple's $30-million gift to help homeless in Vancouver

Coun. Kerry Jang, a University of B.C. professor of psychiatry who specializes in mental health issues and is the city’s representative on housing and homeless issues, was nearly moved to tears by the donors’ largesse. He said he and city staff, including Judy Graves, the coordinator specializing in dealing with the homeless, have sometimes despaired at trying to solve the complex, interwoven issues of homelessness, addiction and mental health.

“It is a bit of an emotional moment for me, simply because for many years Judy and I and many of our staff have been out there and we see the suffering every single day. And every day I feel hopeless because what can we do? We put [people] into hospital for a while and they are let back out on the street again with no hope. It is just a revolving door, a revolving door, a revolving door,” he said.

“Taylor Manor is fundamentally different. Taylor Manor provides that hope, that place of belonging, that place of care. It is like when you come home from a long trip and you come in through the front door and sit down on the couch and breathe ‘I’m home.’ This is the vision of our donors and one that I am so glad to help bring forward.”


It’s stories like this that give me hope that people do care about the homeless.
Edit: I found this article through someone on facebook who wrote:
the numbers are stupid. 30 mill for 50 some people?
And I wrote:
The article says, “$14 million renovation and expansion plan for the 1915 Tudor Revival-style heritage mansion” so that’s to get it started and the annual operating budget is $900,000.
Sounds like the rest of the money is being put in an account where the interest will continue to pay for operations. Restoring buildings is crazy expensive and housing in general in Vancouver is very costly. This insures that after renovations, that the place will continued to be used for its intended purpose to help the homeless, and not be bought by some developer when times get tough.

Besides being a really long winded answer to somebody complaining on their own facebook (I’m waiting to be mocked), I forgot to mention, government funding is very fickle stuff. While the current municipal gov’t in Vancouver is striving to end homelessness, the provincial gov’t hasn’t been as gung-ho about putting homeless people in new units.


If funding is freely given by one gov’t, when a different one is elected that funding can just as easily stop. Which makes operating a non-profit very precarious - cozy up to close to one gov’t and the next pulls your funding, don’t cozy up enough to the one you have and they’ll forget the great work you are doing. It’s best not to have to rely on gov’t funding at all, but that requires donors and often very generous donors, so that groups can adapt to the needs of their community and the lean times can be weathered.

Filed under homeless homelessness Vancouver donors complex needs addiction mental health housing